UFOs sighted!

I’m going to ask a silly question……. Have you ever made a New Year’s Resolution? Well of course you have! I have as well. I suppose a better question (though possibly still silly) is what does that have to do wit UFO sightings?

Well…….

This year, my own resolution is to deal with the UFOs. The ever dreaded ‘UnFinished Objects’ that have been lurking (ok, ok….. stored) in that cedar chest over there (insert chin jut/thrust motion here).

I have been quilting for many years, so that trunk has gotten quite full. I don’t think there is even room for moths in there…. which can be a good thing!

So, with the flipping of the calendar page I decided I needed a do-able resolution this year, one that would be fun to complete. I have always been a list maker. You know, one of those crazy people that gets a disproportionate amount of satisfaction by crossing things off the to do list.

Anyhow… I figured I should add some action to the thought so I opened the trunk….. honestly I had forgotten about some of the items in there.

Here is the first item in the list, and by list I mean this blog post. In no particular order let me introduce you to my UFOs…….

I will have lots of practice pieces to use and finish up as I learn my Nolting 18 longarm!

Happy Quilting!

Learning the Longarm….. A Date With Jack

Not long ago I bought myself the most wonderful Christmas gift….. a ‘new to me’ Nolting 18″ longarm quilting machine with a 10′ frame! YAY! I have wanted a longarm for years….. my stack of UFO’s and pieced quilt tops, in storage and patiently awaiting their turn to be quilted….. are rejoicing.

Anyone that has ever tried out a longarm, tried FMQ (free motion quilting) on a domestic machine or has hand quilted knows that each way of quilting requires practice… and some more practice…. and maybe a bit of practice!

Of course I have some experience with each, most quilters graduate from one to the next to the next. After all, most of us love a new challenge!

The learning curve can be steep though, especially when your stored tops have more patience than the quilter! Which is definitely my case.

I started with a little practice swatch, about 36″ square. Once that was filled up I swapped it out for a baby quilt panel. No seams but lots of things to outline and background space to fill.

All the while, I was building my skill set. Loading the frame, advancing the rollers, learning the machines reach, how to get from one area to the next and try not to get backed into a corner, how to slow down to get smoother flow for corners…… all going marvelously! Until……. top thread breaks, loopy nests on the back and broken needles. Sighs….

So started the inevitable date with Jack…. 

 

Meet Jack…. he may be pocket sized but he loves to let ‘er rip!

As I had already  ‘graduated’ to a full sized quilt, hand pieced 50+ years ago by my neighbour and her mother (both passed long ago) which was already sandwiched and basted…. when my troubles began.

About 1/3 of the way through quilting I had to wind a new bobbin. Not thinking much if it I zipped it onto the winder and let ‘er fly! Turns out bobbin winding needs a wee bit more attention than that! It ended up too loose and uneven, Messing up my tension and causing the aforementioned horrors.

Just in the nick of time the Towa bobbin tension gauge I ordered arrived!

After taking the time to watch several YouTube videos of bobbin winding and tension adjusting, setting up a new practice patch on the frame and about 4 hours of fiddling around with bobbin and then setting the top tension….. I achieved successful stitching! YAY!

At this point a new dilemma. Do I finish what I can while the quilt is loaded or take it off to have my date with Jack before reloading and proceeding? As I was on the last row of blocks I opted to keep going while the going was good! I finished quilting as much of the top as I could as I had removed the basting stitched before noticing the nests.

After completing what I could, I added a few pins to the areas that needed to be undone,  removed the quilt from the frame and sat down for a long date night with Jack and Netflix.

If you have never picked out longarm stitching, take my word for it, it’s a tedious job at best!

After the picking and ripping and maybe just a little cursing….. the front and back looked like my Chinny-chin-chin! Tweezers were a great help in getting all the little thread hairs out… but now there are holes.

 

What’s a Quilter to do with that you ask? I asked the same question, didn’t have an immediate answer and put it all aside. I did however put some more marker pins in so I could see the spots needing attention before picking it up again. Sometimes the brain needs to percolate a solution.

As I was doing laundry the next day it occurred to me! I use a Conair Garment Steamer for my work shirts instead of ironing. (Ironing is only for patchwork, right?) so I thought I’d give it a whirl on the quilt top.

 

What a marvelous breakthrough, not only did it remove 95% of the stitch marks it also dealt with the wrinkles! To pull this off I draped the quilt over the shower rod and steadied with one band while steaming with the other. My bathroom also has the best light in the house, which made it easier to see the white thread on white background.

 

My next job will be to reload the quilt and get all the blank spaces done…… though it may need to wait a few days, there is already another quilt on the frame….. eeps!

So the links in my story… they take you to Amazon.ca where you can purchase the same items that I have used and trust. I always search out the best deals at the time and I love passing them on. If you do purchase something from my link I earn asmall commission on thesale, which costs you nothing! Win win huh?

Little Evergreen 10 Minute Tree Ornament

If you have ever visited Northern Ontario, especially the northern route around Lake Superior, you couldn’t help but notice the bounty of evergreen (Coniferous) trees that grow here. This little Scrappy Evergreen can be whipped up in very little time with materials from your scrap bin and each Scrappy Tree will be as unique as the ones that Mother Nature grows!

Christmas Tree Ornament

For this project you will need:

3 fabric squares, 1 each that measure 3″, 4″ and 5″. I used 3 different green prints but you can use any colours you like.

Approximately 1″ piece of brown bias tape, cord, ribbon (for tree trunk)

1 x10″ length of yarn, small ribbon, embroidery floss, string (for hanger)

Standard sewing equipment. (Instructions will be for machine sewing, hand sewing tips will be in brackets) which include: scissors, thread, sewing machine, serger (optional)

Fold a square in half opposite corners together to make a triangle. Fold again to line up raw edges and make a smaller triangle. Sew with a serger, or machine (or by hand) across the raw edge.

Repeat with the other 2 squares.

Use the brown bias tape to make the trunk. Sew to the centre of the bottom triangle.

Lay the triangles onto each other overlapping and aligning the points. Sew through the edge stitching to secure to the triangle underneath. (Tack sew in the middle of each if sewing by hand).

Stitch the yarn or ribbon through the top point and tie into a loop to make the hanger.

These little trees make great gift toppers or tags. You can personalize with names, the year, sew on beads or other decorations if you wish.

Merry Christmas!

DIY dog scarf

Luna is a 7month old miniature dachshund. She weighs in at about 7 pounds.

A scarf for your favourite pooch is simple to make! Directions are for a small to medium sized dog with a collar that is 3/4″ wide.

Cut a square from valentine fabric, 10″ x 10″

For a larger dog adjust the size of your starting square accordingly.  For a retriever about 15″ is a good size.

Folded square, right sides together

Fold your square in half, right sides together, to make a triangle

 

Cut the points off

With the folded edge away from you cut off the ‘points’ on the right and left side of the fold. I make the length of the cut 1″ so that it will accommodate the 3/4″ collar size.

If you are making this for a larger dog (15″ starter square) adjust your cut line to be approximately 1-3/4-2″ long to accommodate a larger collar.

Open your ‘triangle’ and fold a 1/4″ seam allowance on your freshly cut edges towards the wrong side of the fabric and stitch down.

It should look like this!

 

Fold back into a triangle, right sides together. Stitch a 1/4″ seam along all raw edges. Leave the folded over edge ‘open’.

Trim off the tip on the bottom edge, be careful to not cut through the stitching. Turn the scarf right side out.

Once you get it turned press it flat. Topstitch a seam 1″ from the folded edge, keeping the ends open. This will create the ‘tube’ that you slide the collar into. Also topstitch the perimeter of the triangle.

Slide your dog’s (or cat’s) collar through the tube pocket and you are done!